Wednesday, October 30, 2013

bonus features: the war of the welles

This post offers supplementary material for a Torontoist post I recently wrote, which you should dive into before reading any further. 

Source: the Hamilton Spectator, October 31, 1938.
CBC having control over all Canadian radio stations - imagine the field day Sun Media would have had with that fact had it existed in 1938!

"There is no doubt that [the] United States government will conduct an investigation, and we will leave it them," federal minister of transport C.D. Howe told the Globe and Mail. "We have very friendly relations with their communications commission, but on program matters we deal directly with NBC or Columbia [CBS]. We take the occasional program from Columbia, but it so happens that we had Charlie McCarthy on CBC last night when this broadcast was on Columbia." 

Monday, October 28, 2013

bonus features: lou reed's walk on the wild side, in toronto

This post offers supplementary material for a Torontoist post I recently wrote, which you should dive into before reading any further. 

Source: the Globe and Mail, November 14, 1966.

While the Globe and Mail ran a picture but no article regarding the November 12, 1966 appearance of the Exploding Plastic Inevitable show in Hamilton, the Star did the opposite. For some reason, Nico's name was spelled ENTIRELY IN CAPS throughout Gail Dexter's review. A sampling:
The films are simple enough--The Underground and Edie [Sedgwick] and NICO and lots of black leather projected on a huge screen to intense rhythmic noise. The action builds to a sado-masochistic climax and then The Underground comes on stage.

The group plays with a persistent heavy beat so loud that the floor of the new gym vibrates, and they play for two hours with lights, films, and optical patterns flashing behind them. Songs like "Heroin" (it's my life and it's my wife) to which Gerard simulates a fix, and "Death Song for Hell's Angels" (shiny, shiny, shiny leather, whiplash girl-child in the dark) through which the dancer flagellates himself.

But NICO is the star. She's tall and blond and beautiful in a remote northern way. She played herself in Fellini's Dolce Vita and now she sings with the Underground; and, in her singing, she projects a tragic awareness that becomes almost painful. Her final number, "If I'm late, will you wait for me?" holds the audience enthralled for a half-hour.

And that was one of the problems: The audience, about 800 students, just sat there stunned for three hours. They were supposed to dance but the gym is so big that only a few couples were sufficiently exhibitionist to try--but they went wild. A one-time McMaster student, Charlotte Kennedy, just ran up on the stage and started dancing with Gerard. He flashed lights on her and cavorted for the cameramen.